Monthly Archives: October 2016

R&D and The SCA Board of Directors

A while back, due to the articles I wrote about titles, I was asked if I wanted to be a nominee to The Board of Directors of The SCA. I agonized over the decision but decided to put my name in for it.

I agonized over the decision because the BoD (Board of Directors) is the single most hated aspect of the SCA. They are hated because of what has become a seemingly monolithic black box of rules lawyering, policy making, and reactionary behavior that, in my nearly 30 years in the SCA has not led to a single decision that has benefited the populace of the game in anyway that shows that having this entity is worth while.

Now, let me be absolutely clear about this – I don’t know what goes on with the BoD for the most part. I am certain that there are things that the BoD has dealt with that have been a benefit, but that most of the membership simply don’t know about because it’s not “news worthy”. Much like the job a lot of IT professionals have, if they are doing it right you will never notice it. You’ll only see them when things are going wrong.

The BoD has this same issue.

But this is the only bit of “defense” I am willing to offer up on their behalf. This is what is called “giving the benefit of the doubt.”

So, the current situation with the “R&D” (revocation and denial) of two members of our kingdom who have been outstanding individuals, one of whom is a multi-Peer of at least 30 years, has come as a shock.

It has been pointed out that there was enough evidence to warrant an investigation of a situation that involved money collection and handling around an event, but not directly tied to the event funds themselves. If there is one thing that the BoD responds to its money.

But here is where the process breaks down.

The BoD launched an investigation. The people being investigated had no idea. They didn’t know anything about it. They didn’t hear anything about it. They were left completely out of the loop. When they finally did hear about it, they were informed that they were accused AND convicted of wrongdoing, but were not informed of who their accuser was or even the list of things, except in vague generalities, that they had been accused of.

So, without benefit of anything even remotely resembling “due process” two people who have dedicated a huge amount of time, effort, resources, to an organization built on the concepts of honor, chivalry, and courtesy have been denied any right whatsoever to address the charges and otherwise clear their name. Not only that, but they have been removed, permanently, from an organization which they love by a body of individuals who barely participate at all and who seem to have forgotten everything the organization actually stands for.

Now there is a cost in this. A serious impact.

That impact is the loss of faith in the SCA at large. It is an understandable reaction but I think that it is not the right reaction.

You see it’s not the SCA that has created this situation. It is the BoD. It is the monolithic black box of secrecy that has caused the BoD to be mistrusted. It is the flawed procedures of a governing body who has lost touch with what the SCA is actually about.

I am certain that there are a whole host of “legal reasons” why the BoD conducts its investigations the way that it does, but it seems that this process is deeply flawed when compared to the actual investigation process of real world legal proceedings. I’m sure that lawyers looking to protect the umbrella organization that is SCA Inc have used their skills to create a system designed to maximize the protections of their interests.

But in that process it has clearly lost it’s humanity. It has clearly lost sight of the fact that we are dealing with people, both flawed and great. People make mistakes. Even the BoD makes mistakes.

People of honor and integrity work to correct those mistakes. They work together to find solutions, to meet out justice that is balanced and appropriate when necessary, and they allow for a world where acting from a place of honor allows them to make that world better.

That is a lesson the BoD seems to have forgotten.

Now, I am seeing more and more people who are giving serious thought to abandoning their participation in the SCA altogether. At the very least many are making statements about no longer volunteering to run events knowing as they do now that if there is even the slightest chance someone might get suspicious over completely innocent actions that it could result in just as reactionary a response. There are people who very reasonably feel that the BoD does not have our best interests at heart.

While so many others are heading for the door, I am sitting here considering the fact that my name is on that list of nominees for a BoD position. I have been considering whether or not I still want that chance or if I have become just as disillusioned as so many others are right now.

I’ve decided to stay on the list. My reason for staying is exactly the same as why I choose to accept the nomination in the first place; the best way to change a thing is from within. I don’t know that I will ever get on the BoD or not. But if I do I know that this is one of the things I think I would change. I would want to work with both the BoD and the populace to find a way to make these unfortunate proceedings more reasonable, more workable, and more just for everyone.

In the meantime what can we do?

Write. For my readers in this kingdom who are more aware of these specific events, write about this. For my readers in other kingdoms consider events you know about that are similar in nature and write about those. This problem isn’t specific, it’s systemic. It happens everywhere.

Maybe, just maybe, if the BoD hears from enough of us we can get the ball rolling on this kind of change.

If you want to write to the BoD as a group you can use the following email address: directors@sca.org

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